Study highlights benefits of green space

Research Body
University of Edinburgh

Extract
Having access to green spaces significantly reduces the gap in wellbeing between richer and poorer people, a study found.

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OLIVER HEATH on the new approach to eco-design

Publication
MyGreenPod

Extract
Urban life and nine-to-five desk jobs are leaving us disconnected from the natural world we evolved in — but by transforming the space around us we can bring the connection back, deepen it and be better off as a result.

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Urban Air Quality Report

 

Research Body
The Woodland Trust

Extract
Whilst air quality in the UK has improved in recent decades, concentrations of some pollutants, such as oxides of nitrogen, are now levelling off and there remain serious health issues relating to air pollution, particularly in towns and cities. Air quality is often listed as one of the potential benefits of increasing tree cover in urban areas, but few urban greening projects appear to take into account how air quality goals can best be achieved.

 

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NASA clean air study

Research Body
NASA / ALCA

Extract
The NASA Clean Air Study[1] was led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in association with the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA). Its results suggest that certain common indoor plants may provide a natural way of removing toxic agents such as benzeneformaldehyde and trichloroethylene from the air, helping neutralize the effects of sick building syndrome.

 

 

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